Posted by David Oates 1 week ago

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Once you’ve lost it, it’s almost impossible to get back.

Take the Trump Administration’s Communications Team. They got off on the wrong foot -- several times -- and doubled down by sticking to their guns to argue points that were later proven to be false.

We have the Sean Spicer’s inauguration attendance debacle:

The Kellyanne Conway Bowling Green and General Flynn missteps:


And the infamous Stephen “I need to take a remedial civics lesson” Miller’s embarrassing discussion of judicial review:


The results of not looking credible are gigantic. Just this week, one popular news network program is banning Ms. Conway from appearing.

I feel this is the tip of the iceberg for this administration. We already see calls for the media not to cover Presidential press events live as a result of a perceived lack of credibility. In short, every statement will now be given, to borrow Trump’s words, “extreme vetting” before being validated. At stake is the successful advancement of the President’s initiatives.

Organizations should take notice. While you may not agree with a news organization’s priority or angle, telling anything less than the truth will set you back quicker than anything else. You will find yourself considered  “persona non grata” and run the real chance of falling into anonymity. While the media may not be the only — or even primary — way of disseminating information, your inability to be genuine and truthful to reporters will do far more harm than good.

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